justAtadcast: Episode 1 – The Amazing Spider-Man

July 3, 2012 — 8 Comments

This blog has entered a brand new world! I am now podcasting. The podcast is called, appropriately enough, the justAtadcast. It will be me, along with one or two other guests, discussing a topic du jour and then doing an in-depth, spoilerific review of a new release film. The format may change or grow or evolve or mature or explode over time, but for now I figured it’d be best to keep things simple.

For this inaugural episode I brought on Sean Burns, film critic for Philadelphia Weekly, and Josh Spiegel, host of the Mousterpiece Cinema podcast, to discuss the concept of franchise reboots and review the latest superhero reboot, The Amazing Spider-Man. It’s a solid 70 minutes of film kvetching and all-around geekery.

You can listen here:

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/justatadcast/Episode_1_-_The_Amazing_Spider-Man.mp3]

Or download by right-clicking and pressing “save as”.

Alternatively, you can subscribe to the podcast via iTune:

or rss:

Note: The episode is my first stint at hosting a podcast in a while, so forgive my umms and uhhs, I’m still getting back into the swing of things. Also, there were a couple hiccups, including a dropped mic during the review that was basically impossible to edit around. Forgive the technical faults, and be sure to leave some feedback and how to improve the show or topics you’d like to hear discussed.

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8 responses to justAtadcast: Episode 1 – The Amazing Spider-Man

  1. 

    I’m so glad you got around to do this again! Considering it’s the very first episode I think you did very well. You’re a good discussion leader and I think the format was just right.

    Cheers!

    • 

      Thanks. I have a few ideas for making the show a bit smoother and breaking the ice a bit better with the guests, but for now I’m pretty pleased that I’ve put together a podcast at all.

  2. 

    As someone who liked the film, I found the discussion a bit too cynical for my liking. Also, you sort of lost me when you said “Uncle Ben didn’t have to die,” since that is pretty much the most important catalyst of the entire Spider-Man mythos.

    BTW, it was Macho Man Randy Savage who wrestled Spider-Man in the first film.

    • 

      I disagree that Uncle Ben had to die because the film is an adaptation. Other stuff can change so this can change, too. More importantly, if they’re going to kill him, then why do it in such a half-assed way? Make it huge. Give it more weight. Let it hang over the whole film. Unfortunately it doesn’t. The way it’s written and the way it plays out makes it feel like they just killed him because they felt they had to to appease comic book fans. I can tell you as someone who’s never read a Spider-Man comic, had Uncle Ben not died I’d have been perfectly fine with it so long as the story was good and the motivations of the characters tracked.

      • 

        You make some points there, however Uncle Ben’s death is not something than can be erased from the Spider-Man canon.

        The line “With Great Power, Comes Great Responsibility” is actually the main theme of the comics and Uncle Ben’s death is the ultimate symbol of what happens when Spider-Man was not responsible with his powers. It’s his one great failure that he has to atone for.

        You should search out the 1990s Spider-Man animated series if you haven’t seen it. I still think that’s one of the best portrayals of the character (while your at it, check out the animated series for X-Men, Fantastic Four, and Iron Man – the 1990s were full of animated Marvel adaptations)

        • 

          Again, just because it was in the comics, and just because it’s canon there, doesn’t mean the movie has to use it, and certainly not in such a lame way. Even the choice to let that robber go doesn’t seem all that heavy, unlike the similar sequence in Raimi’s Spider-Man. The whole thing is done very poorly and gives the film no weight, and if they wanted to try doing something different, finding another way to express the same themes, that might have been much more interesting to me and it would’ve made the film seem way more original. Plus, just because you don’t kill him now doesn’t mean you can’t kill him in the next film.

          Also, it goes to my point that the line “With great power, comes great responsibility” is never actually said in the film. The filmmakers clearly tried to avoid big moments like that because they didn’t want to seem like a carbon copy of the first film. Instead, in every instance, they went half the distance and then backed away, making it not only seem like something of a remake, but a poor one at that.

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Trackbacks and Pingbacks:

  1. Everybody’s Talkin’ 7 – 6 (Chatter from Other Bloggers) | The Matinee | Cinematic Passion & Perspective - July 6, 2012

    […] For your listening and reading fulfillment, I give you… I usually don’t link to sites two weeks in a row, but Corey has rejoined the ranks of the podcasters. Take a listen to his first episode where he discusses THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. […]

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